Coronavirus: US Navy captain pleads for help over outbreak

The captain of a US aircraft carrier carrying more than 4,000 crew has called for urgent help to halt a coronavirus outbreak on his ship.

Scores of people on board the Theodore Roosevelt have tested positive for the infection. The carrier is currently docked in Guam.

“We are not at war. Sailors do not need to die,” Captain Brett Crozier wrote in a letter to the Pentagon.

Captain Crozier recommended quarantining almost the entire crew.

In the letter Captain Crozier said that with large numbers of sailors living in confined spaces on the carrier isolating sick individuals was impossible.

The coronavirus’ spread was now “ongoing and accelerating”, he warned, in the letter dated 30 March.

“Decisive action is needed,” he said.

“Removing the majority of personnel from a deployed US nuclear aircraft carrier and isolating them for two weeks may seem like an extraordinary measure. This is a necessary risk.”

It is not clear how many crew members on the Theodore Roosevelt have the coronavirus. The San Francisco Chronicle, which first reported on the letter, said at least 100 sailors were infected.

Speaking to Reuters news agency, a US Navy spokesman said the service was “moving quickly to take all necessary measures to ensure the health and safety of the crew of USS Theodore Roosevelt”.

Source: bbc.co.uk

IMSC Enforces Safety Measures to Protect Members from COVID-19

Photo By NAVCENT Public Affairs | 200330-N-NO146-1002 MANAMA Bahrain (March 30, 2020) Service members assigned to the International Maritime Security Construct (IMSC) practice social distancing in the workspace. The IMSC ensures freedom of navigation and free flow of commerce in international waters throughout the Arabian Gulf, Strait of Hormuz, the Bab el-Mandeb Strait, and the Gulf of Oman.

MANAMA, BAHRAIN

03.30.2020

Courtesy Story

The International Maritime Security Construct (IMSC) has been practicing several safety precautions to promote the health and safety of all its members with the recent COVID-19 outbreak.

No members of the IMSC have fallen ill to COVID-19 as of current.

“The well-being of IMSC personnel is critical to our mission,” said Commodore James Parkin, commander of Combined Task Force Sentinel, headquartered in Bahrain. “However, with a pandemic such as this, our people become the mission. We must ensure good health for the sake of their families and each other.”

Personnel supporting IMSC headquarters typically work in close quarters, however, as the need for social distancing has increased, so have the rules for how the day-to-day operations are conducted.

“Our operational tempo remains constant,” said Parkin. “fortunately our ships are unaffected and their mission continues. On shore, we have rescheduled meetings for mission-critical members only, reconfigured our work stations to allow a six-foot distance, and pay particular attention to the cleanliness of work stations and personal hygiene.”

Hand sanitizer, bleach wipes, anti-viral cleaning sprays, and soap and water are readily available throughout the work area. The team breaks at least four times per day to conduct cleaning stations.

The Multi-national, British-led IMSC deploys advanced capabilities through the region as part of a surveillance and detection effort, leading to de-escalation and deterrence through transparency. The IMSC ensures freedom of navigation and free flow of commerce in international waters throughout the Arabian Gulf, Strait of Hormuz, the Bab el-Mandeb Strait, and the Gulf of Oman.

Source: dvidshub.net

Abu Sayyaf team heads towards Malaysia on the hunt for kidnap targets

Sabah

Sam Chambers

The International Maritime Bureau (IMB) Piracy Reporting Centre has been alerted by Malaysian intelligence that an Abu Sayyaf kidnap for ransom group left Jolo Island in the far south of the Philippines, yesterday destined for Sabah, Malaysia.

Security consultants Ambrey suggest the target area is understood to be around Felda Sahabat and Tambisan.

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Source: splash247.com

Commentary: A cat-and-mouse game between pirates and Southeast Asian maritime security authorities

Despite stepped-up law enforcement in Southeast Asia’s seas, today’s pirates are one step ahead of authorities, says Eric Frécon.

SINGAPORE: “A lion never dies; it sleeps”, says an African proverb.

The same can be said for Southeast Asian pirates and sea robbers, long neglected after the academic and diplomatic world chose to refocus on illegal fishing in the South China Sea in recent years given rising tensions in those disputed waters.

Like the phoenix, regional pirates and sea robbers may rise from the ashes.

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Source: channelnewsasia.com

Lithuania Joins the International Maritime Security Construct

Persian Gulf/SoH

MANAMA, BAHRAIN

03.26.2020

Courtesy Story

U.S. Naval Forces Central Command / U.S. 5th Fleet

MANAMA, Bahrain – The International Maritime Security Construct (IMSC) welcomes Lithuania’s participation in the multinational efforts aimed at enhancing maritime security throughout key waterways in the Middle East.

Lithuania is the eighth member nation to join the IMSC since it formed in November 2019. Other members include Albania, Australia, Bahrain, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, and the United States.

The IMSC is enabling nations to work cooperatively to promote the free flow of commerce, deter threats to shipping, and enhance maritime domain awareness and surveillance in the Arabian Gulf, Strait of Hurmuz, the Bab el-Mandeb Strait and the Gulf of Oman.

British Royal Navy Commodore James Parkin, the Commander of IMSC, expressed his appreciation to the Lithuanians for taking a leading role in regional security matters.

“As the eighth member of the IMSC, Lithuania joins us to ensure the safety of all our shipping in the Gulf region and we look forward to other nations joining our operation,” said Parkin. “Threats to the free flow of commerce are an international problem, and we are honoured that Lithuania is now part of the team assisting in upholding the principles of freedom of navigation.”

Source: dvidshub.net

COVID-19 And Embarked Security Teams: Security At What Cost?

The outbreak of COVID-19, and the increasingly draconian measures taken by states to control the spread of the virus has led to the widespread disruption of global supply chains. The knock-on impact of restricting the placement of embarked security teams in the Indian Ocean has been keenly felt in the global shipping and security markets. The decision to embark security personnel requires operators to balance commercial considerations with the risks faced. In a world where the logistics of embarking security personnel has become increasingly complex, many of Dryad Global’s clients are considering their options and exploring alternatives.

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Source: hellenicshippingnews.com

Law amended to protect jobs of seafarers abducted at sea

Fabian Koh

Seafarers who are abducted by pirates or armed robbers in an attack at sea will stay employed and be paid their salaries while being held captive, said Senior Minister of State for Transport Lam Pin Min yesterday.

It does not matter whether the seafarer’s employment contract has expired or that either party to the contract has given notice to suspend or terminate it, he added.

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Source: straitstimes.com