Gulf of Guinea: Security team comes alive in 3 months

By Godwin Oritse

In a bid to secure oil and gas operations as well as fishery activities in the Gulf of Guinea, countries in the region have agreed to set up an expert working team that would implement resolutions reached at the just concluded Gobal Maritime Security Conference, GMSC, held in Abuja, last week.

Disclosing this to newsmen at the end of the conference, Director General of the Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency, NIMASA, Dr. Dakuku Peterside, said that the team will be established within the next three months.

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Source: vanguardngr.com

State Of Insecurity/Sea Piracy In Bonny: Concerned Indigenes Vow To Stop NLNG Boats, Accuse Security Of Complicity

Concerned indigenes of Bonny under the aegis of Bonny Stakeholders Vanguard (BSV) have threatened to shut down movement, and boat shuttles of Nigeria Liquefied Natural Gas Company (NLNG) should the deplorable security situation in Bonny Island continue unabated, without security intervention.

The group who gave this indication has also accused security agencies especially the Police, Marine Police and Navy of complicity in protecting perpetrators of crime and violence on the Island.

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Source: thenigerianvoice.com

Nigeria seeks collaboration to tackle maritime crimes

By Sulaimon Salau and Joke Falaju

Worried by the impact of maritime crime on the regional economy, Nigeria has sought partnership with other countries to tackle the menace headlong.

The Director-General, Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA), Dakuku Peterside, who made this call at the ongoing Global Maritime Security Conference, in Abuja, said maritime insecurity remains one of the significant challenges affecting international trade, and the quest for sustainable use of ocean resources for economic growth, improved livelihood and job creation.

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Source: guardian.ng

MarsecNews: If NIMASA is genuinely looking to collaborate with other nations on maritime crime, then it could be a significant move for the Gulf of Guinea. Traditionally, navies in the region have been slow to cooperate with one another but when they have, it has paid dividends. Overall intelligence sharing in the Gulf of Guinea between states has been poor, but efforts in recent years have improved the situation slightly. There remains, however, an issue with certain nations who have multiple agencies all vying for government funding and competing with one another for relevance. As organised criminal gangs have shifted from petro-piracy to crew kidnap for ransom, the speed of naval response becomes more crucial; it’s a lot harder to track a skiff full of hostages than a tanker.

Genuine cooperation between nation states in the Gulf of Guinea would go a long way to suppress maritime crimes such as piracy and armed robbery, allowing for faster response times. However, as long as some countries continue to downplay the threat of piracy, the situation will persist.

Indian maritime authority issues alert on Nigerian waters

By Godwin Oritse

AT the backdrop of high incidences of piracy in the Gulf of Guinea, GoG, coterminous with Nigeria’s continental shelf, the Indian maritime authority has warned its seafarers to steer clear of Nigerian waters for fear of falling victims.

Disclosing this at the just concluded World Maritime celebration in Lagos, Director General of the Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency, NIMASA, Dr. Dakuku Senibo Peterside said that NIMASA was currently working on the development with a view to assuaging the fears of the Indian authorities.

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Source: vanguardngr.com

Investors put off by Nigeria’s piracy problem

Maritime chief pledges to lead the fight against piracy to counter the negative impact of attacks in the Gulf of Guinea which are deterring would-be investors in Nigeria’s shipping sector

Linton Nightingale

THE heightened risk piracy attacks in the Gulf of Guinea is putting progress in Nigeria’s shipping sector on hold, with would-be investors deterred due to the heightened security issue.

Dr Dakuka Peterside, director general of the Nigeria Maritime Administration and Safety Agency, which is responsible for overseeing security under its scope of activities in the country’s coastal waters, said the “negative impact” of hijackings and kidnappings are stunting shipping’s development.

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Source: lloydslist.maritimeintelligence.informa.com

NIMASA averts fire disaster onboard oil tanker in Lagos

By Sulaimon Salau

What could have been a major disaster at the Lagos anchorage was yesterday averted, as the Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA’s) swift intervention rescued a burning crude oil tanker, Sea Voyager.

NIMASA confirmed the incident on its social media platform, adding that the Regional Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (RMRCC), at Kirikiri, mobilised fire-fighters from other government agencies including the Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA), to put out the fire.

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Source: guardian.ng

Growing maritime insecurity raises question on NIMASA’s $195m maritime security contract to Israeli firm

By Samson Echenim

Despite a running $195 million maritime security contract awarded to Israeli firm, Messrs HLSI Security Systems and Technologies by the Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency, Nigeria is seeing growing incidences of piracy attacks and vessel hijacking.

The situation has led to shipping companies now spending millions of dollars in providing security onboard the vessels while in Nigerian waters.

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Source: businessamlive.com