Four senior immigration officers abducted in Rivers

By Bisi Olaniyi

Four senior officers of the Nigeria Immigration Service (NIS) were on Tuesday morning kidnapped on Bonny waterway in Rivers State.

An indigene of coastal Bonny, the headquarters of Bonny Local Government Area of Rivers, who spoke in confidence through the telephone, disclosed that the immigration personnel left Bonny for Port Harcourt, the state capital for documentation and other official matters at NIS’ headquarters, when the sea pirates attacked them on the high sea, thereby whisking them away in a Commando-like style.

To continue reading, please click here.

Source: thenationonlineng.net

ITF Calls for Action on Gulf of Guinea Piracy

Following back-to-back attacks on two vessels in the Gulf of Guinea last week, the International Transport Worker’ Federation has called for urgent global and regional cooperation to fight piracy off West Africa.

On November 2, pirates kidnapped nine crewmembers from the Norwegian-flagged MV Bonita while the vessel was at anchor off the coast of Benin. Two days later, four crewmembers were taken hostage off the coast of neighboring Togo from the Greek-flagged Elka Aristotle. Several other abductions have been reported in the Gulf of Guinea in recent months, including eight crewmembers taken hostage off Cameroon in August and 10 seafarers off the coast of Nigeria in July.

To continue reading, please click here.

Source: maritime-executive.com

Oil theft and Nigeria’s self-imposed poverty

Jerry Uwah

Nigeria is wallowing in self-imposed poverty.  The situation would remain so for a pretty long time because no one in federal government has the political will power to confront the elements of backwardness in the land. Agriculture has remained in the hands of millions of peasant farmers who eke out a living through subsistent farming with primitive implements. Nigeria cannot feed its teeming population.

Nigeria is practically broke, but the federal government insists that what it is battling is sporadic cash flow problems rather than absolute cash crunch.

To continue reading, please click here.

Source: blueprint.ng

We’re engaging security agencies to secure waterways – NIWA

The Managing Director of the Nigeria Inland Waterway Authority (NIWA) Dr George Muoghalu, said the authority is engaging security agencies, especially the Nigerian Navy to play the expected role of ensuring that the waterways are secured and safe for use.

He also said the Authority was working hard to ensure that the 10000 kilometers waterways are all year round navigated.

To continue reading, please click here.

Source: dailytrust.com.ng

Maritime Security in Gulf of Guinea: France advocates concerted efforts

Mrs Genevieve Darrieussecq, the Secretary of State to the French Minister for the Armed Forces, has advocated for concerted efforts to address the challenges of maritime security in the Gulf of Guinea.

She said concerted efforts were needed to carry out a decisive work to combat the scourges that threaten safety at sea, which was an indispensable work for the development of the West Africa sub-region.

Mrs. Darrieussecq made the appeal in Accra at the G7++ Friends of the Gulf of Guinea Group (G7++FoGG) 2019 summit.

To continue reading, please click here.

Source: businessghana.com

NEITI: Nigeria lost $42bn to oil theft in 10 years

By

The Nigeria Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (NEITI) has raised the alarm that in the last 10 years, crude oil and refined products worth the sum of $42 billion were stolen from the country.

This was contained in a Policy Brief titled ‘Stemming the Increasing Cost of Oil Theft to Nigeria’ released and made available to newsmen by NEITI’s Director, Communications and Advocacy, Dr. Orji Ogbonnaya Orji yesterday in Abuja.

To continue reading, please click here.

Source: newtelegraphng.com

Oil theft bleeding the country dry

EXACTLY six years after Chatham House, an independent policy institute based in London, the United Kingdom, first alerted the world to the systemic theft of Nigerian oil “on an industrial scale”, the country is still haemorrhaging from the deep cut inflicted by massive oil theft. Instead of witnessing a stem-to-stern effort to check the grand larceny, the situation has profoundly worsened. Although the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation puts what is stolen at 120,000 barrels per day, a new report reveals that an average of 400,000 barrels of crude is purloined on a daily basis.

To continue reading, please click here.

Source: punchng.com