Ghana starts construction of new naval base

Ghana’s president Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo has officially launched construction of the country’s new naval base with a sod-turning ceremony.

Akufo-Addo said the base is part of the country’s efforts to improve maritime security in the Gulf of Guinea and protect the country’s oil and gas sector. Construction of the Forward Operating Base in Ezilinbo in the country’s Western Region began on 16 December 2019.

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Source: defenceweb.co.za

20 guards arrested over construction of illegal oil wells

By Eugene Agha

Twenty security officials securing the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) pipelines have been arrested for their alleged involvement in the construction of over 310 illegal oil wells for the purpose of syphoning petroleum products.

It was learnt that the guards arrested, including officials of the Nigeria Security and Civil Defence Corps (NSCDC), are among those posted to secure NNPC pipelines that runs from Atlas Cove to Ejigbo and Mosimi depots both in Lagos and Ogun states.

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Source: dailytrust.com.ng

Rise of pirates in the Caribbean

By Rinsy Xieng

While pirates are becoming rarer off the Horn of Africa, particularly in Somalia, since warships patrolled the area, the number of acts of piracy and robbery is steadily increasing, with a sharp upsurge in Caribbean. For example, 28 events were recorded in 2019 off the island of Grenada, compared to only 3 the previous year. In the West Indies, it is mainly pleasure boats that are targeted.

Boaters and merchant ships

Pirates no longer hesitate to board large vessels, such as merchant vessels, even though the palm goes back to the Gulf of Guinea, where almost a third of the attacks took place there according to the report of the MICA Center, the center of expertise French Maritime Safety, which has just published its annual report. In 2019, for example, the organization recorded 360 events related to piracy and robbery. This figure has been stable for four years but less than it was 10 years ago.

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Source: rci.fm

3 expatriates kidnapped by Niger Delta pirates regain freedom

Three expatriates kidnapped by suspected pirates along the creeks of Sigbene community, in Burutu council area of Delta state, have reportedly regained their freedom.

A joint security operation, which embarked on a manhunt for the suspects, was said to have effected their release.

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Source: shipsandports.com.ng

Kenya’s tough task as it leads regional anti-piracy efforts

By Samuel Baya

Kenya will be handed a heavy responsibility when it officially takes over the chairmanship of a regional anti-piracy body. Kenya was elected to chair the Contact Group on Piracy Off the Coast of Somalia (CGCPS) last year.

The post comes with the onerous task of ensuring that cases of piracy and other maritime insecurity incidents are comprehensively addressed.

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Source: businessdailyafrica.com

Oil bunkering: Navy hands over 57 Nigerians, 7 Sri-Lankans, 2 Ghanaians to EFCC

Ndubuisi Ugah

The war against oil bunkering and sea pirates received a major boost yesterday when the Nigerian Navy (NN) handed over 57 Nigerians, seven Sri- Lankans and two Ghanaians, suspected to be involved in oil bunkering, to the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC).

The News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) also reports that the seven vessels, involved in the oil bunkering and having no valid approval, were arrested by the Nigerian Navy between December 3 and 30, 2019. While addressing journalists, after the handing over to the EFCC, the Commandant of NN ship, NNS BEECROFT, Commodore Ibrahim Shettima, said the nation would have lost N906,250, 000, if the culprits had been successful in their operation.

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Source: newtelegraphng.com

Why Pirates Are Giving Up On Oil

Piracy in some of the world’s most critical oil chokepoints is on the rise–but now, pirates are resorting back to another method of income generation better suited to times of lower oil prices: taking human captives.

Sometimes, black market oil prices just aren’t lucrative enough. In the days of $100 oil, oil theft was a hot commodity. Today, pirates are supplementing their stolen oil income with ransomed sailors, creating a whole new set of problems for the oil industry to tackle.

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Source: oilprice.com